By Carol Haddad, DMD
September 20, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
UnpleasantCrackedMouthCornersCanBeTreatedandPrevented

Ever have a paper cut or an irritated hangnail? They're not considered major health problems, but, boy, can they sting!

Something similar can occur in the corners of your mouth called angular cheilitis. It's also known as perleche, from the French word “to lick” (a common habit with this type of sore). It can occur at any age, with children or young adults developing it from drooling during sleep or orthodontic treatment.

Older adults, though, are more prone than younger people for a variety of reasons. Age-related wrinkling is a major factor, especially “marionette lines” that run from the mouth to the chin. Dried or thinned out skin due to exposure from cold, windy weather may also contribute to perleche.

Perleche can also develop from within the mouth, particularly if a person is experiencing restricted salivary flow leading to reduced lubrication around the lips. Poorly cleaned dentures, weakened facial supporting structure due to missing teeth, vitamin deficiencies and some systemic diseases can all lead to perleche. And if an oral yeast infection occurs around the cracked mouth corners, the irritation can worsen and prolong the healing process.

To clear up a case of cracked mouth corners, you should promptly see your dentist for treatment. Treatment will typically include some form of antifungal ointment or lozenge applied over a few days to clear up the sores and prevent or stop any infection. You might also need to apply a steroid ointment for inflammation and other ointments to facilitate healing.

To prevent future episodes, your dentist may ask you to use a chlorhexidine mouthrinse to curb yeast growth. If you wear dentures, you'll need to adopt a regular cleaning routine (as well as leaving them out at night). You might also wish to consider updated dental restorations or orthodontics to improve dental support, and help from a dermatologist if wrinkling might be a potential cause.

Cracked mouth corners won't harm you, but they can make for a miserable experience. Take steps to relieve the irritation and any future occurrence.

If you would like more information on angular cheilitis or similar oral conditions, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Cracked Corners of the Mouth.”

By Carol Haddad, DMD
September 10, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral hygiene  
3WaystoProtectYourDentalWorkFromanEarlyDemise

There have been vast improvements over the years in various methods to restore diseased, damaged or missing teeth. A lot of this is due to better restorative materials that are stronger and more life-like.

But given the mouth's hostile environment and the forces generated from chewing, even the most durable restorations could fail. You can, however, improve their durability through proper care and good protective practices.

Here are 3 ways to preserve your dental work and keep it functioning for years or even decades to come.

Daily oral hygiene. Although the bacteria in dental plaque doesn't affect non-living dental materials, it can infect and weaken living tissues around fillings, crowns or implants. Because these tissues often support restorations, an infection could cripple your dental work's survivability. You can prevent this by practicing daily brushing and flossing, and getting regular dental cleanings, to remove plaque and decrease your risk of dental disease.

Dietary choices. You can further prevent dental disease by restricting your consumption of sugar and eating foods rich in calcium and other nutrients. But there's one other thing to keep in mind about what you eat: Some foods can stain veneers and other restorations, as well as natural tooth enamel. If staining occurs at different rates, your dental work could stand out from your natural teeth and look out of place. You can help avoid this by limiting items in your diet known to stain (like wine or coffee) and practicing good oral hygiene.

Poor habits. Many of us have nervous habits like nail-biting or ice-chewing, or an unconscious habit of grinding teeth. Habits like these can damage restorations like composite bonding or veneers. To prevent the chances of this happening, take steps to stop habits and practices that involve biting down on hard objects (including foods like fruits with hard skins). You should also talk to your dentist about solutions to reduce teeth grinding, especially if it's occurring while you sleep.

Above all, keep up your dental visits to regularly monitor the condition of your dental work and obtain repairs or enhancements as needed. By taking care of these valuable restorations, you can help them continue to function and serve your needs for a long time to come.

If you would like more information on maintaining your dental restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Extending the Life of Your Dental Work.”

LingualBracesMightbeaBetterFitforYourActiveLifestyle

If you've decided to straighten your teeth, you've made a wise choice for both your dental health and your smile. Now you may be facing another decision—which method to use for bite correction.

Not too long ago people had only one choice—traditional braces all the way. But that changed with the introduction of clear aligners, a series of removable plastic trays worn one after the other to realign teeth. In all but a few situations, clear aligners accomplish the same outcome as braces but without the conspicuous appearance and, thanks to their removability, difficulty in brushing and flossing teeth.

And now, a recent innovation in orthodontics could give you a third option—lingual braces. These are braces fixed to the back of teeth adjacent to the tongue (hence the term “lingual”), rather than on the front as with traditional braces. They essentially perform the same action, only instead of “pushing” teeth like traditional braces, they “pull” the teeth to the target positions. Lingual braces may also ease certain disadvantages people find with traditional braces or clear aligners.

If you're into martial arts, for instance, you may encounter blows to the face that increase your injury risk while wearing traditional braces. Likewise, if you're highly social, clear aligners can be a hassle to take out and keep up with if you're frequently eating in public. Lingual braces answer both types of issues: They won't damage your lips or gums in the case of blunt force facial contact; and they remain out of sight, out of mind in social situations.

Before considering lingual braces, though, keep in mind that they may cost 15-35 percent more than traditional braces. They also take time for some people to get used to because of how they feel to the tongue. And, they're not yet as widely available as traditional braces, although the number of orthodontists who have received training in the new method is increasing.

If you'd like to know more about lingual braces and whether they're right for you, speak to your dentist or orthodontist. You may find that this new option for improving your dental health and your smile fits your lifestyle.

If you would like more information on lingual braces, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Lingual Braces: A Truly Invisible Way to Straighten Teeth.”

TalkWithYourDentistAboutAntibioticTherapyBeforeImplantSurgery

Dental implants are far and away the most “tooth-like” restoration available today for missing teeth. Not only do they look real, they also mimic dental anatomy in replacing the tooth root.

To install an implant, though, requires a minor surgical procedure. And, as with any surgery, that includes a slight risk for a post-surgical infection. For most patients this isn't a major concern—but it can be for people with certain medical conditions.

One way to lessen the risk for implant patients whose health could be jeopardized by an infection is to prescribe a prophylactic (preventive) antibiotic before implant surgery. The American Dental Association (ADA) recommends the measure for patients with artificial heart valves, a history of infective endocarditis, a heart transplant and other heart-related issues.

In the past, their recommendation also extended to people with joint replacements. But in conjunction with the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgery (AAOS), the ADA downgraded this recommendation a few years ago and left it to the physician's discretion. Indeed, some orthopedic surgeons do recommend antibiotic therapy for patients before surgical procedures like implantation for up to two years after joint replacement.

These changes reflect the ongoing debate over the proper use of antibiotics. In essence, this particular argument is over risks vs. benefits: Are pre-surgical antibiotics worth the lower infection risk for patients at low to moderate risk in return for increased risk of allergic reactions and other side effects from the antibiotic? Another driver in this debate is the deep concern over the effect current antibiotic practices are having on the increasing problem of antibiotic-resistant bacteria.

As a result, dentists and physicians alike are reevaluating practices like prophylactic antibiotics before procedures, becoming more selective on who receives it and even the dosage levels. Some studies have shown, for example, that a low 2-gram dose of amoxicillin an hour before the procedure can be effective with much lower risks for side effects.

If you're considering dental implants and you have a medical condition you think could be impacted by the procedure, discuss the matter with your dentist and physician. It may be that pre-surgical antibiotics would be a prudent choice for you.

If you would like more information on getting dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Implants & Antibiotics.”

By Carol Haddad, DMD
August 11, 2020
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   bad breath  
4SimpleThingsYouCanDotoStopBadBreath

When they weren't building pyramids or wrapping mummies, the ancient Egyptians mixed herbs and spices with a little honey to make small lozenges. Their purpose: to fight halitosis, that perennial scourge of polite society. More specifically, they were the first known breath mints.

Just like our ancient forebears, we're still trying to stop bad breath—to the tune of $12 billion annually for breath-freshening products. For the most part, though, fresher breath is still largely the byproduct of dedicated oral care. In recognition of National Fresh Breath Day this August 6th, here are 4 simple things you can do to help eliminate embarrassing bad breath.

Remove dental plaque. Mouth bacteria proliferating within a thin buildup of food particles is called dental plaque—the main culprit in 85—90% of bad breath cases. These bacteria can emit volatile sulfur compounds (VSCs), which have a characteristic rotten egg smell. You can reduce bacteria and their foul odors by removing plaque with daily brushing and flossing and twice-a-year dental cleanings.

Boost your saliva. An inadequate flow of saliva, often a side effect of certain medications, can leave your mouth dry and susceptible to bacterial growth and subsequent bad breath. You can increase saliva flow by drinking more water, using saliva-boosting aids, or speaking with your doctor about alternative medications with less of a dry mouth side effect.

Brush your tongue. Some people find their tongue is “Velcro” for tiny food particles, which attract bacteria. It's always a good idea to brush your tongue (especially toward the back) to loosen and remove any clinging food particles. If it continues to be a problem, you can also employ a tongue scraper for a more thorough tongue cleaning.

Get a checkup. Although bacterial growth from inadequate hygiene is the usual cause for bad breath, it isn't the only one. Dental diseases like tooth decay or gum disease can also create unpleasant mouth odors, as well as serious conditions like diabetes, kidney infections or certain cancers. If your bad breath persists despite diligent hygiene, see us or your doctor for a more comprehensive exam.

During our long war with halitosis, we've learned a thing or two about its causes. We've also learned that practicing good oral habits is the best thing you can do to beat bad breath.

If you would like more information about controlling bad breath, please contact us or schedule a consultation. To learn more, read the Dear Doctor magazine article “Bad Breath: More Than Just Embarrassing.”





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